LinkedIn China stops operations amid stricter compliance requirements

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LinkedIn has announced that it will stop local operations in China. It will soon close LinkedIn China to pave way for a new regional job board app.

LinkedIn first launched its Chinese version in 2014, adhering to local restrictions. With China putting more pressure on foreign service providers, the social network for professional has been forced to shutter operations.

“While we’ve found success in helping Chinese members find jobs and economic opportunity, we have not found that same level of success in the more social aspects of sharing and staying informed. We’re also facing a significantly more challenging operating environment and greater compliance requirements in China. Given this, we’ve made the decision to sunset the current localized version of LinkedIn, which is how people in China access LinkedIn’s global social media platform, later this year,” explains LinkedIn.

LinkedIn was facing ongoing challenges to adhere to strict local rules around online speech in the country.

Earlier this year, Chinese officials sanctioned the company after “failing to control political content on its platform”. The Cyberspace Administration of China kept a close eye on in-app interactions. The nation’s regulators also monitored how LinkedIn keeps the separation between its main app and the Chinese version.

The latest stats show that LinkedIn has around 54 million users in China. In comparison to other job lists, this number is not a massive amount. Its main competitor WeChat has 1.25 billion active users. With the seemingly insurmountable gap in the market, LinkedIn may have evaluated that keeping the local version was not worth the investment.

linkedin china

LinkedIn’s usage numbers will lose 54 million from its 774 million global figures. And it will be the last US social media platform to stop operations in the country known as the Great Firewall.

World’s largest social network Facebook tried for years to enter the profitable Chinese market. But it gave up the idea, along with other social media providers in the US, after failing or unwilling to meet the required standards on censorship.

LinkedIn was the final straw on how to work with Chinese regulators. But it will not stop investing in the country.

The company will launch a new job board app to replace LinkedIn China.

“Later this year, we will launch InJobs, a new, standalone jobs application for China. InJobs will not include a social feed or the ability to share posts or articles. We will also continue to work with Chinese businesses to help them create economic opportunity,” says LinkedIn. 


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Author: Francis Rey

Francis is a voracious reader and prolific writer. He has been writing about social media and technology for more than 10 years. During off hours, he relishes moments with his wife and daughter.

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