Twitter set to curb harassment with new features

Share the joy
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Twitter Filter

Credit: https://blog.twitter.com/2016/new-ways-to-control-your-experience-on-twitter

Twitter is working on new set of tools to curb with harassment on its network. The move is aimed at controlling how people experience the microblogging site. When launched, the features will be available to everyone on Twitter.

Harassment on Twitter assumes worrisome dimension every day, and the company wants to bring things under control. As a matter of fact, Twitter users are among the most vulnerable to harassment among major social media sites.

Women, men, old and young of color have always held the view that the platform is filled with racists and other abusive remarks. The new features will restrict tweets considered unacceptable to a user in his notification list.

“We’re introducing some new features that will give you more control over what you see and who you interact with on Twitter, rolling out to everyone in the coming days,” Twitter’s Product Manager Emil Leong said in a blog post on Thursday. The company announced two significant tools to make the platform safer for everyone.

Notifications Settings

Now you can restrict notifications from people you don’t want to see when you are on Twitter. This feature is available for every user—including mobile and on twitter.com. It is so easy to get going with this tool as all you need to do is turn it on to restrict notifications you don’t want to see.

Twitter is also making it easier to manage your notifications settings—you can now access them directly from your notifications tab.

Quality Filter

Want to improve the quality of tweets you see on Twitter? Twitter started testing this feature in 2015, and has now made it available to everyone. You will be able to filter tweets with variety of signals, including account and behavior of other users. To use this feature, all you have to do is turn it on.

“Turning it on filters lower-quality content, like duplicate Tweets or content that appears to be automated, from your notifications and other parts of your Twitter experience. It does not filter content from people you follow or accounts you’ve recently interacted with – and depending on your preferences, you can turn it on or off in your notifications settings.”

The tool is not designed to block tweets from people you recently had a conversation with or followed. However, you will be able to choose to see any incoming notifications from accounts you follow.

Last July, Twitter permanently banned the account of controversial conservative writer and blogger Milo Yiannopoulos over his abusive comments against actress-comedian Leslie Jones.

“People should be able to express diverse opinions and beliefs on Twitter. But no one deserves to be subjected to targeted abuse online, and our rules prohibit inciting or engaging in the targeted abuse or harassment of others. Over the past 48 hours in particular, we’ve seen an uptick in the number of accounts violating these policies and have taken enforcement actions against these accounts, ranging from warnings that also require the deletion of Tweets violating our policies to permanent suspension,” Twitter’s statement read at the time.

a couple of days back, BuzzFeed reported that some Twitter employees may have secretly filtered tweets with abusive language during a Q&A session with President Obama. Quoting. Quoting a “former senior Twitter employee” the report said that during a May 2015 #AskPOTUS event, Dick Costolo told employees to filter out abusive tweets with algorithm, while a different source claimed that a team manually got rid of messages that slipped through.

Got something to say about this story? What are your views on Twitter’s new tools aimed at curbing harassment?


Share the joy
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Author: Ola Ric

Ola Ric is a professional tech writer. He has written and provided tons of published articles for professionals and private individuals. He is also a social commentator and analyst, with relevant experience in the use of social media services.

Share This Post On