Twitter introduces new label to profiles of US election candidates

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Credit: https://blog.twitter.com/official/en_us/topics/company/2018/introducing-us-election-labels-for-midterm-candidates.html

Twitter has come up with a new label for all US election candidates. All Midterm candidates in the US will have new labels added to their profiles. The badges will appear below a candidate’s name on tweets in users’ timelines. All candidates running for state governor, the US Senate and the House of Representatives during this year’s midterm election will have the labels added to their accounts.

Over the years, Twitter has become one of the most reliable places people turn to when they need authentic news and information. People turn to Twitter for breaking news, and it is only natural to expect to find and read tweets that are credible. With such labels, Twitter is probably adding an extra tag to identify what is reliable and what is not.

The labels will provide credible information about a political candidate, and will help people understand more facts about the candidate. Bridget Coyne, Senior Public Policy Manager at Twitter said:

Labels contain relevant information about a political candidate, including the office the candidate is running for, the state the office is located in, district number (when applicable), and will be clearly identifiable with a small icon of a government building.

Twitter, however, is not alone on this, the microblogging company will be partnering with Ballotpedia, a non-profit, civic organization that publishes nonpartisan information on federal, state, and local politics. Information provided by Ballotpedia will help identify all campaign accounts of candidates once they qualify for the general election ballot for an office.

Credit: https://blog.twitter.com/official/en_us/topics/company/2018/introducing-us-election-labels-for-midterm-candidates.html

All labels will start appearing after May 30 on the campaign Twitter accounts of candidates that are already qualified for the general election ballot for an applicable office. Such candidates, however, must have given Twitter the permission to apply the label.

The last US election was marred with a lot of controversies, especially fake news. Fingers from various quarters pointed at Russian authorities for meddling in the election, and this didn’t go down well with Twitter and several other social media networks out there. Twitter’s new label will go a long way to help users avoid the mistakes that happened during that election, and probably take informed decision.

Prior to the last US election, Facebook launched a feature that helped voters to identify what was in the ballot. The feature also showed you where the candidates stood on issues — regardless of what political office they were running for.

Facebook collaborated with the Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) to ensure that voters were presented with a preview of the ballot they were expected to receive on the election day. Users who noticed any issue with the CTCL data could provide feedback and help correct the dataset before that day.

Twitter played a major role before, during, and after the last US election that ushered in President Trump. The social media giant partnered with CBS to livestream the two conventions held by the Republican and the Democratic parties in 2016. Millions of people watched the streams on both mobile devices and the Web using the microblogging’s Live platform.


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Author: Ola Ric

Ola Ric is a professional tech writer. He has written and provided tons of published articles for professionals and private individuals. He is also a social commentator and analyst, with relevant experience in the use of social media services.

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