Twitter increases profile display name to 50 characters

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Credit: https://twitter.com/TwitterSupport/status/928777729180254208

A lot to do with numbers these days—Twitter has once again broken one of its rigid policies on display name. While some of us were still trying to warm up to the news of how Twitter smashed the 140-character limit barrier, the microblogging company has once expanded the profile display name to 50. Profile display name can now be as long as 50 characters in length—and that gives you much room to include your middle name or whatever.

Starting today, your Twitter display name can be up to 50 characters in length,” the microblogging company announced via tweet. “Go ahead, add that middle name or even a few more emojis.”

Just to clarify things, the change doesn’t affect your user name, but will only apply to your display names. In other words, your handle or user name that has the @ symbol right before it remains the way it is—15 characters and no more.

If you are the emoji type, this leaves you with more room to fill those spaces in case you have nothing more to add to your name. Now you have more characters to actually inform your followers what your full names are, and probably make it easier for people to identify you on the platform easily.

Earlier in the week, Twitter’s 140-character limit was expanded to 280. The microblogging platform first gave an indication that it was working on expanding its character limit beyond the 140 limit to 280 last September, but has now followed that up by making it officially available to every user, except to those in Japan, China and Korea. Those three countries will continue to tweet in their respective languages within the old character limit of 140 for obvious reasons—“cramming is not an issue in these languages”, Twitter said.

The company described it as “tweeting made easier,” according to the heading of the post announcing the expansion on its official blog. While the new 280-character limit could offer a bigger opportunity to say more than a few words in one tweet, it certainly could make conversation boring. It would sort of reduce or kill creativity and ability to be direct in your tweets; but of course that’s just my opinion. Twitter, however, has a different view and seems to have taken a few things into account when running the test for the 280-character limit last September. Aliza Rosen Product Manager explains:

“We saw when people needed to use more than 140 characters, they Tweeted more easily and more often. But importantly, people Tweeted below 140 most of the time and the brevity of Twitter remained.”

Nonetheless, it is a win-win situation for most marketers who will henceforth have more characters to express themselves. On the contrary, majority of users won’t find it amusing because more boring sales tweets will now be forced down their throat. Words that easily could have been compressed into 140 characters or less will now be a common thin on timelines.


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Author: Ola Ric

Ola Ric is a professional tech writer. He has written and provided tons of published articles for professionals and private individuals. He is also a social commentator and analyst, with relevant experience in the use of social media services.

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