3 Tips to Engage Customers in Social Good

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engage customers in social good

Victorians rally for No New Coal projects. (Image by Takver)

The internet has changed how entrepreneurs run their companies. Talks about slush funds, environmental degradation, and sweatshops emerged. And these factors influenced how consumers make their purchasing decisions.

With people leaking their bad practices, companies are finding ways to uphold corporate social responsibility.

Modern companies are bringing in new ideas to inculcate social good into business. But most of them find it hard to make customers aware.

PR firm Edelman surveyed 5,600 consumers to determine how many people support companies with good causes.

Their key findings:

  • 7 out of 10 respondents would pay more to a business with relevant causes
  • 55 percent would help promote these brands
  • Only 39 percent knew of brands with good causes

Good corporate responsibility involves activities that help improve society. But most of these actions have excluded customers.

While some companies admirably pledge to charities, these actions seldom involve their customers. Hence, they barely get the spotlight.

So, help your company stand out by engaging customers in social good.

Engaging in Social Good

Companies often avoid advocacies. They believe it disaffects some customers.

The fear of taking a risk clouds their good judgement. Rather than promote credibility and amass followers, some companies choose to stay in their wheelhouse.

Advocacy is powerful. Your moral declaration will rally brand followers at the most important time.

Here are three tips you can use to engage customers in social good:

1. Resonate with your tribe.

Avoid generic causes. You can take a better stance with a discrete issue.

Pick an advocacy that reflects a larger theme. It will help you focus your time and effort. Better yet, it will touch the lives of your target audience rather than the general public.

When POTUS Trump withdrew from the Paris Agreement, companies stood their ground. Some of them rallied their customers to lobby elected officials.

The commitment to climate change is intact.

2. Provide ease of participation.

Weak participation undermines any advocacy.

Technology is on your side, so put it to good use. Engage customers in social good through their mobile devices.

You can call your followers to action by sending text messages or posting on social media.

The Pew Research Center for Internet and Technology has been following the trends that shaped the mobile revolution.

They found that 95 percent of Americans now own a cellphone. Smartphone ownership this year is at 77 percent, up from 35 percent in 2011.

Text messaging and social media are the most popular activities across mobile devices in the US.

3. Walk with your customers.

The internet has closed gaps in communication. You can organize rallies through social media or send emails to policymakers.

Do your research. Some customers prefer to post and interact on Facebook or Twitter. So, find the social network where most of your followers reside.

Once you have a shortlist of platforms for delivery, send a unified message. How people share your message is their choice, so provide options.

Takeaway

Advocacy reminds your customers that they too can move mountains. Show them how much you care by harnessing the power of their voices.

People respect brands with good causes—if only they can hear you. So, bring it out in the open and tell customers why you are worthy of their time.


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Author: Francis Rey

Franz believes voracious readers become good writers. So, he reads anything that piques his interest.

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