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Report Shows More Facebook Friends Means Greater Stress

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Having a lot of friends is usually a good thing.  However, having a lot of friends on Facebook may not always be terrific, as a news report indicates.

 

A report by University of Edinburgh’s business school reveals that more Facebook friends can mean more stress. (Image: a_sorense (CC) via Flickr)

More FB Friends, More Stress

According to a recent report from the Business School at the University of Edinburgh, the more friends a person has on Facebook, the greater the chances of him or her getting stressed.  The study has discovered that the more people a person connects with on the social network, the greater the possibility of him or her causing offence.  In turn, this leads to greater stress in not wanting to offend anyone.

Adding Parents or Employers on FB

Likewise, the report cites that greater anxiety results when a parent or employer is added on the list of Facebook friends.  The problem arises when a user posts something about himself or herself that may be considered by others as “unacceptable.”

Typically, these may be statuses involving behavior such as smoking, drinking, swearing, and other “reckless” activities.  In addition as more and more “older” people are joining Facebook, problems may arise since they have different expectations from those of the younger network users.  Notably, more than half or about 55% of parents are “friends” with their kids on Facebook.

Different Social Groups

Furthermore, the study discovered that the average Facebook user is connected with seven different social groups: friends known offline, which was added by 97% of respondents; extended families (81%); brothers and sisters (80%), friends of friends (69%), and co-workers or peers (65%).

Another interesting finding is that only one third of the respondents use Facebook’s “listing” privacy setting, which can be utilized to manage information viewed by different kinds of friends.  Meanwhile, it was also found that more Facebook users are friends with former “partners” than with their current ones.  A total of 300 respondents were surveyed in the report, and their average age is 21 years.

Ben Marder, the author of the report, shares that Facebook used to be an online place where people were free to post whatever they liked.  These days, however, having a boss or a parent as a Facebook friend means one has to be careful when updating his or her status.

 

 

About Neal Alfie Lasta

I enjoy learning and writing about social media and the latest in mobile updates. Don't forget to subscribe and receive our latest posts in your inbox.

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