Huawei Denies Espionage for China

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Huawei has denied involvement in espionage and related illegal activities after Australia’s decision to drop the Chinese telecoms equipment maker from its list of broadband network bidders.

The company’s report says it has “never damaged any nation, or had the intent to steal any national intelligence, enterprise secrets or breach personal privacy” and promises to avoid any form of illegal behavior among its employees.

Huawei’s statement came after the federal government of Australia decided to prohibit the company from bidding on the country’s National Broadband Network.

However, industry followers and analysts see the statement as an attempt to stop all hunches about the Communist Party of China’s control on Huawei.

Unnamed government sources believe such relations open the possibility of Chinese organizations spying through Huawei’s communications system.

John Suffolk, SVP and Global Security Officer of Huawei Technologies and a former British official, writes in the 25-page report how the company demands global efforts to establish legal and technical security standards.

While the paper is pushing the creation of new standards, it fails to propose which standards to adopt and attacks current laws for its inconsistencies and failure to address crucial security threats.

A spokesperson for Huawei clarified in another statement that the report was never a direct reaction to security concerns on the company’s operations in Australia, the US, or anywhere else.

“You could say that the information in the paper could be helpful in those countries where we’ve had challenges,” said Huawei representative Scott Sykes.

“It’s not a specific response to those situations, but does it apply to those? Yes.”

Sykes quickly contradicted suspicions when asked whether Huawei assisted the Chinese government to spy foreign countries.

“No, we deny that,” he said.

Huawei President Ren Zhengfei called on a similar appeal for security collaboration in June this year at a business conference in Russia, where he requested full cooperation from the global security industry for a unified goal.

However, he made no reference of suspicions revolving about his company, but warned that security threats will keep on growing.

Ren is the founder of Huawei Technologies and was a military engineer for the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) in 1987.

25 years after leaving the military and establishing Huawei, Ren now leads the world’s second-largest supplier of telecoms network gear after Sweden’s LM Ericsson.

huawei-denies-espionage-for-china 

Source: Huawei (PDF) | The Washington Post

Image: Kai Hendry via Flickr (CC)


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Author: Francis Rey

Francis is a voracious reader and prolific writer. His work appears on SocialBarrel.com and several other websites, covering social media, technology and other niches.

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