Google is rolling out a redesigned News Tab in Search on desktop

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Credit: https://www.thenewflyfisher.com/blog/tnff-now-on-google-news/

Google has announced a new design for News Tab in Search on desktop. Just last year, Google overhauled its news app, and continued to add new updates and changes since then. The same cannot be said of the desktop version as it remained stagnant and never welcomed any change lately. Things will no longer stay the same as new changes are on their way according to the search engine giant.

The new design was teased by the Google News Initiative via Twitter on Friday. According to a video shared earlier today, the new News tab uses a card-based layout with larger images. This makes it a lot easier to parse than the current design—and as a matter of fact, it brings it almost at per with the mobile app.

The new design is still being rolled out by Google and will be available to all users in a matter of weeks from now. What that means is that you will have to be patient if you haven’t started seeing the new changes on your desktop.

In 2017, Google added “fact check” tool to Google News to further narrow its news sources to credible media houses. This is a game changer because news considered to be fake will be tagged as such to warn users of the implication of clicking it.

Google said the tag won’t be displayed or added to every search result. The company also said tags on search results may differ, especially in occasions when different publishers carried out the check—and in such cases, results or conclusions reached may be different.

Google itself will not be responsible for checking the facts behind the search results, but is collaborating with others to carry out the checks. The goal of the check is to help you make informed decisions. You will also be able to make your informed decision as the search engine giant continue to make the checks visible.

If you are a publisher and want to use or be included in the feature, Google said “you must be using the Schema.org ClaimReview markup on the specific pages where they fact check public statements.” Another option is that you can use Share the Facts widget developed by the Duke University Reporters Lab and Jigsaw. However, you only qualify to use the latter option if you are regarded as an authoritative source of information—and this is based on algorithm. Other conditions are highlighted by Google in a blog post on Friday.

Google began adding labels to its articles nine years ago to make it easier for readers to access different categories of content. Users can already access and identify content on the news service based on “Local Source,” “Highly Cited,” “Opinion” “Trending,” “In Depth” and “Related.” Content is also provided to readers by category to make using the service a stroll in the park.


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Author: Ola Ric

Ola Ric is a professional tech writer. He has written and provided tons of published articles for professionals and private individuals. He is also a social commentator and analyst, with relevant experience in the use of social media services.

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