Facebook reveals who uploaded, used your info for targeted ads

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Facebook has updated the information that users can see on why an ad is on their account.

The social network blogged the changes to “Why am I seeing this ad?” on Thursday.

It has specific information on why you are seeing a certain ad with interests and categories.

You will now see more information about the businesses who upload a list of your information. And you will see the advertisers using that list for targeted ads.

The new features are hot on the heels of Facebook, as it deals with concerns over its privacy practices and how it uses personal data to show ads.

This is the first time Facebook users will see which third-party data traders and organizations are supplying data to the social network for targeted ads.

You can now browse businesses who uploaded and shared a list of your user information, including phone numbers and email addresses.

Facebook says it matches the uploaded information to a person’s profile without showing your true identity to the business through hashing.

Facebook claims this ensures they will not see that personal information. And that a business cannot see your contact information.

For instance, businesses who will share your information may include media agency Starcom USA, identity resolution company LiveRamp, and Oracle Data Cloud. Your information may be uploaded by up to hundreds of businesses.

Facebook will now also show the advertisers who use that uploaded information for targeted ads delivered to you.

The list displays advertisers who uploaded a list from businesses, and used the list to roll out at least one ad in the past week.

You will also see the reasons why you’re seeing an ad on Facebook.

When you select “Why am I seeing this ad” in the dropdown menu of an ad, you will see more exhaustive targeting information.

You get to see the categories or interests that matched you to a specific ad. And it shows where that information came from if you had liked a certain Facebook page or visited a certain website.

On Facebook’s “Your ad preferences” page, you can see who uploaded a list of your info and advertised to it.

“These advertisers have run an ad in the past seven days using a list uploaded to Facebook containing your information, typically an email address or a phone number. Facebook matched the uploaded information to your profile, without revealing your identity to the advertiser,” says Facebook.

The ad preferences page also allows you to choose whether Facebook can show you ads intended to reach people based on different profile fields, including relationship status, employer, job title and education.

“These settings only affect how we determine whether to show certain ads to you. They don’t change which information is visible on your profile or who can see it. We may still add you to categories related to these fields,” Facebook explains.

There page also has ad settings you can enable or disable.

  • Ads based on data from partners – To show you better ads, we use data that advertisers and other partners provide us about your activity off Facebook Company Products.
  • Ads based on your activity on Facebook Company Products that you see elsewhere – When we show you ads off Facebook Company Products, such as on websites, apps and devices that use our advertising services, we use data about your activity on Facebook Company Products to make them more relevant.
  • Ads that include your social actions – We may include your social actions on ads, such as liking the Page that’s running the ad.

Finally, you also have the option to hide targeted ads topics.

“Hide ads about this topic, either temporarily or permanently. You may still see ads related to this topic, but we’ll use your input to improve the ads you see. The number of ads you see won’t change.”


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Author: Francis Rey

Francis is a voracious reader and prolific writer. His work appears on SocialBarrel.com and several other websites, covering social media, technology and other niches.

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