Facebook bans artist’s Christmas cards for being explicit

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Credit: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2017/11/13/facebook-bans-artists-sexual-robin-redbreast-christmas-cards/

Soon it will be Christmas and everyone obviously wants to make the most of the holiday since it only comes once in a year. For Jackie Charley, a British artist that specializes in acrylic artwork, the yuletide offers a big opportunity to quickly upload some cards for those who wish to buy. However, things went contrary to plans albeit when Facebook rejected her artworks; classifying them as “adult items,” The Telegraph reports.

While attempting to upload Christmas images to her Facebook shop, Charley kept getting an error message stating that:

It looks like we didn’t approve your item because we don’t allow the sale of adult items or services (e.g. sexual enhancement items or adult videos).”

Apparently unhappy with her inability to post her messages, she responded with a message, per The Telegraph:

Hilariously, Facebook has blocked my Christmas cards from becoming a product in my shop due to their shameful, sexual nature!

I tried to upload my Christmas card range, but they were immediately rejected by Facebook,” the 52-year old told The Telegraph.

I was shocked, and thought there must have been some mistake, so I tried again – several times. Each time I got the same message.

“There was an option to fill in a form if I disagreed with their verdict, which I did, but without hope that it would ever be seen by a real person and dealt with.”

Not the first time though, Facebook blocked a photo of Neptune’s nude statue for violating its policy back in January. This action angered a local Italian writer, Elisa Barbari; and that time, the social media giant took down the picture of Neptune’s nude status in front of a Piazza del Nettuno in the Italian city of Bologna, claiming it was “sexually explicit”.

Elisa Barbari had chosen the statue to illustrate her Facebook Page “Stories, curiosities and views of Bologna. Unknown to her, the picture chosen was against Facebook’s policy on nudity; and the social media giant didn’t hesitate to apply the rule.

Of course, Barbari didn’t take lightly to the action, and subsequently responded:

Back in the 1950s, during celebrations for school children graduating, they used to cover up Neptune. Maybe Facebook would prefer the statue to be dressed again,” she wrote. She subsequently posted on her Facebook page a message in large letters: “Yes to Neptune, no to censorship.”

Facebook immediately approved her ad, and followed it with an apology, claiming that the ad was taken down in error:

Our team processes millions of advertising images each week, and in some instances we incorrectly prohibit ads. This image does not violate our ad policies. We apologize for the error and have let the advertiser know we are approving their ad.”

Apparently seeing that Charley’s seasonal cards were incorrectly classified as “sexual in nature,” Facebook immediately responded by allowing the cards to be uploaded.

“Our team processes millions of images each week, and occasionally we incorrectly prohibit content, as happened here.

“We approved Jackie’s post as soon as we became aware of our mistake, and are very sorry for the inconvenience caused.”


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Author: Ola Ric

Ola Ric is a professional tech writer. He has written and provided tons of published articles for professionals and private individuals. He is also a social commentator and analyst, with relevant experience in the use of social media services.

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