Apple Park Employees Keep Running Into Glass Walls

Share the joy
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

apple park employees

JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images

Apple called emergency services because some employees walked into the glass walls of its Apple Park campus, MarketWatch reports.

While some patients had minor cuts, none needed hospital care.

Apple completed its $5-billion, 175-acre campus last year. But employees only started moving in to ‘the spaceship’ building this year.

While it is a technical marvel to make glass at this scale, that’s not the achievement. The achievement is to make a building where so many people can connect and collaborate and walk and talk.

– Apple design chief Jonathan Ive in an interview with Wired in May 2017

Ive is one of the best user experience experts around. He oversaw revolutionary designs for the iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and every Apple product since 1997.

The Dream

The new headquarters is a wonderful piece of art; perfect curves, polished surfaces. It seems eccentric until you consider the meticulousness that came about.

Steve Jobs asked British architect Norman Foster and his firm to design Apple’s new headquarters in 2006.

The concept was a giant perfect ring with giant glass panes, carbon fiber, and ground unicorn carcasses.

Each of those 3,000 giant glass panes are 49 feet by 10.5 feet. Easily, the largest curved glass pieces in the world.

Foster and Ive worked together and planned the construction. The surfaces carefully manufactured and laid to perfection.

With multiple challenges and an obsession for perfection, it was inevitable to have multiple delays.

The original plan for a 2015 opening extended until April 2017.

Reuters said Apple and the contractors had constant conflicts on the construction specs of the building.

Apple wanted precision similar to its iPhone assembly specs. The contractors used the one-eighth inch deviation as the construction industry standard.

Despite the painstaking process, the Apple Park design is not infallible.

Back to Reality

After the smacking accidents, employees tagged the walls with sticky notes to avoid recurrence.

Apple saw the markers as a nuisance. They removed the Post-its “because they detracted from the building’s design.”

Too immersed in their iPhones, the employees repeatedly ran into the glass-walled workspaces, Bloomberg reports.

If Apple will not act soon, some employees may take legal action for the workplace violation.

A provision on California laws require employers to protect their employees from “walking through glass by barriers or by conspicuous durable markings.”

The sticky notes were a temporary solution. But Apple needs better markers to stop the accidents.

It seems the company has yet to learn about a safety-first policy.

An 83-year-old woman sued Apple in 2012 when she broke her nose after walking into an Apple Store’s glass door.

The massive ring-shaped Apple Park campus in Cupertino houses around 13,000 employees.

But we have yet to learn how many of them walked or ran into see-through walls.

It serves as a painful reminder on a company’s priorities.

Preoccupied with rolling out impressive consumer products, Apple tripped on basic design flaws and a safe workplace.


Share the joy
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Author: Francis Rey

Francis is a voracious reader and prolific writer. His work appears on SocialBarrel.com and several other websites, covering social media, technology and other niches.

Share This Post On