5 Avoidable Mistakes That Startups Make on Social Media

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By now, all business owners know the benefits of a strong social media presence.

But, like any marketing tool, social media can only live up to its promise when used effectively.

For instance, posting a cat next to your brand logo will melt the hearts of feline lovers. Yet, are these people your target audience for lead conversions?

If this strikes a chord with you (and you want to do better), here are a few mistakes that your startup must avoid as well.

1. Targeting random people.

All startups have a business plan. And social media has a key part in it.

To set goals on social media means finding, understanding, and learning from your target customers.

If your product or service caters to women, your target audience will most likely be using Pinterest. For women under 25, try Snapchat.

2. Not measuring numbers.

How do you know your social media strategy is successful? By crunching numbers.

Your target will not mean anything if you cannot measure how well you are hitting it.

Facebook Insights and Twitter Analytics (and a couple others) will help you track how customers react to each of your posts, how often people mention your brand, which demographics have favorable responses, and more.

3. Launching your brand on too many social networks.

The hype around social media can get to your head. And your excitement may drive you to join as many social networking sites as possible.

Think again. Multitasking on more social networks than needed will divide your time and resources.

For startups, you only need two or three platforms to build credibility for now. Post regularly and engage in meaningful conversations. When the time is right–and you have a loyal following on these original platforms—venture out on social networks where other potential customers exist.

4. Sharing the same unedited content on multiple platforms.

Entrepreneurs do not copy paste. If you do, you are a spammer. And you have no right to spend valuable time on.

So, start small. You can adapt and improve content as you move forward. Comply with the standards and ethics on each social network.

For instance, you can post a press release of your product on Twitter and then upload its photo on Instagram. Using different types of content will keep the conversation going on both platforms.

5. Posting content when customers are sound asleep.

Each of us have different comfort zones in creating content. Your best work may come during the wee hours of the morning or late at night. It does not mean you also have to post it right after.

Before posting your content, make sure your target audience are awake to read it. Otherwise, set it aside and sleep on it until they open their eyes. Better yet, schedule your posts to publish on social networks during peak hours or days.

Buffer Social found that Facebook engagement rate peaks on Thursdays and Fridays. It also hits rock bottom on Saturdays. Yet, Twitter click-through rates peak on weekends.

With all of these in mind (and all other things going on with your business), you wonder how to manage time and resources for an effective social media campaign.

Maybe you can, maybe not. Our best advice for startups is to hire a social media manager. Find someone tech-savvy and creative—someone with the writing skills and marketing experience that fits well with your business.

 

If you have other mistakes in mind, feel free to drop us a comment below.


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Author: Francis Rey

Franz believes voracious readers are good writers. So, he reads or writes anything that piques his interest, especially social media. When AFK, he spends his downtime on road trips and binges.

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